Chapter 5

Chapter 5 - Nutrition and Physical Activity

Sources of Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Iron

SOURCES OF VITAMIN A
Best Sources Good Sources OK Sources
carrot
liver
pumpkin
sweet potatoes
winter squash
whole milk products

Getting Started with MyPlate

ChooseMyPlate.gov

MyPlate Icon

MyPlate is part of a larger communications initiative based on 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans to help consumers make better food choices.

MyPlate is designed to remind Americans to eat healthfully; it is not intended to change consumer behavior alone.

MyPlate illustrates the five food groups using a familiar mealtime visual, a place setting.

Choose MyPlate.gov

MyPlate Icon

MyPlate is part of a larger communications initiative based on 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans to help consumers make better food choices.

MyPlate is designed to remind Americans to eat healthfully; it is not intended to change consumer behavior alone.

MyPlate illustrates the five food groups using a familiar mealtime visual, a place setting.

Feeding the Baby for the First Year

Babies grow quickly during the first year of life and make many changes in the types of foods and textures of foods they are able to eat. As babies grow and develop, watch for the following signs, which will tell you when they are ready for a new food.

Feeding Developmental Skills

Sequence of Infant Development and Feeding Skills in Normal, Healthy Full-Term Infants

Baby's Approx. Age Mouth Patterns Head and Body Skills Feeding Skills or Abilities

Physical Activity

Obesity in Arkansas and the nation is high. The prevalence of obesity continues to be an issue for children across the United States. Nationally, almost one of every five children is considered obese, and 38 percent of Arkansas children are overweight or obese, according to the Natural Wonders Partnership Council (a group of organizational partners involved in children’s issues convened by Arkansas Children’s Hospital to address the critical health issues of children in Arkansas).

Sample Menu for Children Using "My Plate"

Serving sizes vary per age. Offer planned meals and snacks to children and allow them to have as much or as little of the planned meal or snack as they want.
 

USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program Participants

For participants in the USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), the USDA meal patterns must be used. Through CACFP more than 3.2 million children receive nutritious meals and snacks each day as part of the child care they receive.

Reimbursable meals served to infants, children or adult participants in the Child and Adult Care Food Program shall contain (as a minimum) the indicated meal pattern quantities and food components.

Water Availability in the Child Care Food Program

Special Notes and Food Allergies

Honey

Honey should never be given to infants under 1 year of age. It can lead to a very serious disease, “infant botulism,” that can even be fatal. Avoid honey in any form during the baby’s first year. Honey is all right for children over the age of 1 and for adults.

FOODS THAT MAY CAUSE CHOKING

Don’t offer these foods to children under 3 years old unless you have modified them to reduce the risk of choking.

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